Blackwell Companion to Philosophy of Literature

Share

[Updated 8/4: table of contents added]

Forthcoming Blackwell volume, sure to interest many readers of this blog:

Garry Hagberg and Walter Jost, eds., A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature (Blackwell Companions to Philosophy) (2010)

Here is information about the book posted on Amazon, and below that the table of contents (as posted on Blackwell’s website):

Product Description

This monumental collection of new and recent essays from an international team of eminent scholars represents the best contemporary critical thinking relating to both literary and philosophical studies of literature. It helpfully groups essays into the field’s main sub-categories, among them ‘Relations Between Philosophy and Literature’, ‘Emotional Engagement and the Experience of Reading’, ‘Literature and the Moral Life’, and ‘Literary Language’. It offers a combination of analytical precision and literary richness. It represents an unparalleled work of reference for students and specialists alike, ideal for course use.

About the Authors

Garry L. Hagberg presently holds a Chair in the School of Philosophy at the University of East Anglia, and has for some years served as the James H. Ottaway Professor of Philosophy and Aesthetics at Bard College. His many books include Art and Ethical Criticism (Blackwell, 2008) and Describing Ourselves: Wittgenstein and Autobiographical Consciousness (2008). Hagberg is joint editor of the journal Philosophy and Literature. Walter Jost is Professor of English at the University of Virginia. He is the author of Rhetorical Thought in John Henry Newman (1989) and Rhetorical Investigations (2004), and has edited or co-edited six previous books, including (with Wendy Olmsted) A Companion to Rhetoric and Rhetorical Criticism (Blackwell, 2004).

Table of Contents

Introduction (Garry L. Hagberg and Walter Jost)

Part 1. RELATIONS BETWEEN PHILOSOPHY AND LITERATURE

1. Philosophy as Literature and More than Literature (Richard Shusterman).

2. Philosophy and Literature: Friends of the Earth? (Roger Shiner).

3. Philosophy and Literature – and Rhetoric: Adventures in Polytopia (Walter Jost).

4. Philosophy and/as/of Literature (Arthur C. Danto).

Part 2. EMOTIONAL ENGAGEMENT AND THE EXPERIENCE OF READING

5. Emotion and the Understanding of Narrative (Jenefer Robinson).

6. Feeling Fictions (Roger Scruton).

7. The Experience of Reading (Peter Kivy).

8. Self-Defining Reading: Literature and the Constitution of Personhood(Garry L. Hagberg).

Part 3. PHILOSOPHY, TRAGEDY, AND LITERARY FORM

9. Tragedy and Philosophy (Anthony J. Cascardi).

10. Iago’s Elenchus: Shakespeare, Othello, and the Platonic Inheritance(Mark Rowe).

11. Catharsis (Jonathan Lear).

12. Passion, Counter-Passion, Catharsis: Beckett and Flaubert on Feeling Nothing (Joshua Landy).

Part 4. LITERATURE AND THE MORAL LIFE

13. Perceptive Equilibrium: Literary Theory and Ethical Theory (Martha C. Nussbaum).

14. Henry James, Moral Philosophers, Moralism (Cora Diamond).

15. Literature and the Idea of Morality (Eileen John).

16. Styles of Selfishness (Daniel Brudney).

Part 5. NARRATIVE AND THE QUESTION OF LITERARY TRUTH

17. Narrative, Imitation, and Point of View (Gregory Currie).

18. How and What We Can Learn From Fiction (Mitchell Green).

19. Literature and Truth (Peter Lamarque).

20. Truth in Poetry: Particulars and Universals (Richard Eldridge).

Part 6. INTENTION AND BIOGRAPHY IN CRITICISM

21. Authorial Intention and the Varieties of Intentionalism (Paisley Livingston).

22. Art as Techne, or the Intentional Fallacy and the Unfinished Project of Formalism (Henry Staten).

23. Biography in Literary Criticism (Stein Haugom Olsen).

24. Getting Inside Heisenberg’s Head (Ray Monk).

Part 7. ON LITERARY LANGUAGE

25. Wittgenstein and Literary Language (Jon Cook and Rupert Read).

26. Exemplification and Expression (Charles Altieri).

27. At Play in the Fields of Metaphor (Ted Cohen).

28. Macbeth Appalled (Stanley Cavell).

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s